7 Ways To Boost Your Cyber Resilience

7 Ways To Boost Your Cyber Resilience

Cyber attacks are one of the major threats that organisations face today, with each organisation facing 925 cyberattacks per week globally. Considering the amount of data organisations have, they need to ensure they have the right tools in place to help them protect their data. There are a number of things that organisations can do to help protect themselves from these cyber attacks. Here are 7 different ways that an organization can boost its cyber resilience.

Best Practices to Boost Yoour Cyber Resilience

01. Require multi-factor authentication (MFA) for remote access services.

These include, but are not limited to, VPN services and corporate web portals (extranets), as well as e-mail access (e.g., Outlook Web Access or Exchange Online). Whenever possible, avoid using SMS and voice calls to provide one-time codes and consider deploying phishing secure tokens such as smart cards and FIDO2 (Fast IDentity Online) security keys.

Credential stuffing is one of the most common ways that threat actors compromise organizations during an attack. In these attacks, credentials from previous data breaches, including leaked usernames and passwords, are used against an unrelated service. These attacks are made possible because users tend to re-use the same username/password combination. Employees are therefore encouraged to never reuse a password.

In addition, users are advised to use trusted leak checkers to see if their personal email addresses are present in any known data breach and to change immediately any compromised password on the relevant websites and/or applications. The use of a corporate password manager should be encouraged whenever possible.

  1. Ensure all software is up-to-date

Prioritise updating software to fix known vulnerabilities. Managing It is also recommended to reengineer vulnerability management processes so that high and critical severity patches can be deployed as quickly as possible.

Ensure all actions related to patching of endpoints and servers have been completed (e.g. system reboots).

Remember to strongly encourage your employees to patch their personal systems at home and as regularly as possible (e.g. computers, smartphones, and other connected devices).

3. Control third-party access to your internal networks and systems.

This will help you prevent and detect potential attacks if a third party is compromised and used as a beachhead to breach your organisation.

  1. Harden your cloud environments security

Ensure that cloud platforms have strong security controls and separate cloud system management from on-premise system management so that threat actors cannot jump from one environment to another due to discrepancies in security controls.

  1. Review your data backup strategy and use the so-called 3-2-1 rule approach

The rule consists of organisations keeping three complete copies of their data, with two of them locally stored but on different types of media, and at least one copy stored off-site. Your organisation’s backup strategy should be fully aligned with your business needs by setting explicit recovery time (RTOs) and recovery point objectives (RPOs).

  1. Ensure access to backups is controlled, limited, and logged.
  2. Confirm your restore procedures are well documented and tested regularly.
  3. Given the proliferation of ransomware attacks, it is strongly recommended to increase the frequency of backups for critical data. The latest storage technologies facilitate rapid backups of almost any data set in a matter of minutes.
  4. Employees should be trained to save data only on storage devices allowed by your cyber security policy or, if applicable, on the corporate cloud storage and not on their workstations.

In addition, you should ensure that your backup software itself is up-to-date.

  1. Perform Regular Staff Awareness Training and Simulations

To boost your cyber resilience, perform regular staff awareness training and simulations to ensure that IT, system administrators, and overall employees have a solid understanding of your organisation’s security policy and associated procedures. Vigilantly monitoring the misuse of system admin tools can help you prevent attackers from breaching your network. Include simulations on phishing techniques (e.g. identifying spoofed/suspicious messages) and the effects of phishing attacks.

  1. Invest in Creating your Internal Cyber Security Program

Although every organisation needs to implement internal best practices to create cyber resilience and protect business data and interests, hiring a chief information officer or even investing in a certification like the ISO 27001 might be far more beneficial to safeguard an organisation.

A designated chief information officer will help you perform a risk assessment and create an entire cyber security program to ensure safety measures for all your network systems and databases. 

If you are in need of help with your cyber security internal program, don’t forget to press the contact button below. 

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